Seoul to Hong Kong on Asiana Business Class – Almost Missed My Flight!

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We landed around 6:00PM in Seoul and went towards the Asiana First Class Lounge.  We had to exit the terminal and go through security again.  I’m not sure if this was necessary, but we got a little lost.  Eventually we made it through with plenty of time (I thought) and headed to the Asiana First Class lounge while we waited for our flight from Seoul to Hong Kong on Asiana Business Class.

Welcome to Korea

Welcome to Korea

Classy Asiana First Class Lounge

Classy Asiana First Class Lounge

Famous Asiana Piano

Famous Asiana Piano

Quite Spacious

Quite Spacious

When I was on my flight from LAX-ICN, I set my time to Hong Kong time to adjust for jet lag easier. It ended up working pretty well, however, my biggest mistake was that my clock was on Hong Kong time instead of Seoul time!  Hong Kong time is one hour earlier their Seoul time.  We relaxed in the Asiana First Class lounge for a while eating some Haagen Daz ice cream and Korean fried chicken.

Haagen Daz Ice Cream Sandwiches!

Haagen Daz Ice Cream Sandwiches!

Phat Thai hmmm..

Phat Thai hmmm..

Our flight to Hong Kong was at 7:40PM and at about 6:20PM, a lounge attendant let us know that it was time to board.  I thought we had a good 1 hour and 20 minutes left so we took our time.  At about 6:35PM, the lady went up to us and told us to “Please hurry, the plane is leaving”.  She then showed me the time and it was 7:35PM, not 6:35PM!  I had set my time to Hong Kong time, which was an hour early!

We ran as fast as we could out of the lounge and down the long hallway to our terminal.  By the time we got there, it was 7:40PM.  As soon as we got on, they closed the plane doors.  Phew, made it!

We found our seats near the window and collapsed onto them from exhaustion.  I was so happy that we made our flight, things could have been really terrible if we missed our flight.   

Window Seats Angled-Flat Seats

Window Angled-Flat Seats Seats 7H and 7K

View from Seat

View from Seat

The plane originally was a two-cabin plane, but switched to a 3-cabin 777-200 last minute.  I didn’t know that, so we ended up in business class (still great!).  I was surprised that the service was up to par with our previous first class flight to Korea.

Meal service started right away, and we both chose the Ssambap.  This Korean dish uses lettuce/veggies to wrap rice and meat.  Again the food was delicious, although the presentation was inferior to first class (not complaining, just stating the fact).

Menu

Menu

"Salad" 7/10

“Salad” 7/10

Ssambap 9/10

Ssambap 9/10

Fruits, Korean Rice Wine, and Dessert Wine

Fruits, Korean Rice Wine, and Dessert Wine

Nice Presentation of Tea

Nice Presentation of Tea

The flight route is quite interesting as it avoids flying over China airspace.  I’m guessing they are respecting China’s airspace, while we (USA) just fly our fighter jets over their airspace.  Ironically, we slept for a bit on these angled-flat seats instead of our lie-flat seats from our previous flight.

Flight Route

Flight Route

All in all, the Asiana First Class lounge is quite nice and has great food.  Asiana business class also does not disappoint in food and service. I would not hesitate to fly them again in the future.  I think I learned my lesson to always pay attention to the local time.  I was lucky to make my flight this time and learned an important lesson without suffering the consequences.

 

14 comments for “Seoul to Hong Kong on Asiana Business Class – Almost Missed My Flight!

  1. HansGolden
    April 2, 2014 at 1:54 pm

    The flight route is quite interesting as it avoids flying over China airspace. I’m guessing they are respecting China’s airspace, while we (USA) just fly our fighter jets over their airspace. Ironically, we slept for a bit on these angled-flat seats instead of our lie-flat seats from our previous flight.

    Your guess is wrong on both counts. Commercial airliners fly through Chinese airspace all the time and US fighter jets never do.

    • HansGolden
      April 2, 2014 at 2:06 pm

      Anytime US military planes even come CLOSE to Chinese airspace, the Chinese send out fighters to shadow it. Not too many years ago they did so and were so aggressively and closely stalking it that they kamikazed into it!

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hainan_Island_incident

      • Christianity
        April 2, 2014 at 6:52 pm

        @HansGolden “Anytime US military planes even come CLOSE to Chinese airspace, the Chinese send out fighters to shadow it. Not too many years ago they did so and were so aggressively and closely stalking it that they kamikazed into it!

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hainan_Island_incident

        And the US wouldn’t send their jets if a Chinese military jet flew CLOSE to US airspace? Oh wait. The Chinese don’t flew within a few miles of the US mainland.

        And that wikipedia article is quite biased (pro USA), as is usual with English wikipedia.

        • HansGolden
          April 2, 2014 at 7:41 pm

          You’re purposely missing the point and just trying to pick a fight. I said elsewhere that of course the U.S. military shadows foreign militaries close to our shores. This comment was entirely unnecessary: “And the US wouldn’t send their jets if a Chinese military jet flew CLOSE to US airspace?”

          “The Chinese don’t flew within a few miles of the US mainland.”

          We’ve already talked about this. It’s capabilities based. I’ve demonstrated there would be no freakout if China did this.

          “And that wikipedia article is quite biased (pro USA), as is usual with English wikipedia.”

          I welcome you pointing to other sources that provide a Chinese bias. I would find such reading interesting and helpful.

    • April 2, 2014 at 3:02 pm

      Thanks for the info!

      • HansGolden
        April 2, 2014 at 3:05 pm

        OTOH, US military planes do fly in disputed airspace (as the very WIkipedia link I posted explains), but the world seems pretty evenly split on whether it’s international space or Chinese space, so it’s hardly unilateral incursion. Also, it’s possible that the U.S. has stealth planes and drones that do Chinese overflights without detection by the Chinese, but I don’t believe there have been any public reports of that.

    • Christianity
      April 2, 2014 at 6:41 pm

      @HansGolden “Your guess is wrong on both counts. Commercial airliners fly through Chinese airspace all the time and US fighter jets never do.”

      The real question is: Why is an American military plane flying a mission within a few miles from mainland China? Imagine if a Chinese military jet was flying up and down the coast of California, Fox News would call for war.

      • HansGolden
        April 2, 2014 at 6:50 pm

        To spy. The U.S. does it with planes because they have the infrastructure/bases/islands/carriers to, the Chinese and Russians do it with ships and subs and people, because the US is far more open than those countries. You’re wrong about Fox News calling for war. The US freakin’ lost track of a Russian sub in the Gulf of Mexico (where it was patrolling a few miles from our shore like they often do, but the U.S. usually tracks them closely the same way the Chinese do with our planes) and it was reported, but no calls for war.

        • Christianity
          April 2, 2014 at 6:53 pm

          Russian sub? Did I mention Russian. I said Chinese. Show me where the Chinese fly military jets up and the US coast. Show me.

          • Christianity
            April 2, 2014 at 7:04 pm

            up and *down the US coast.

          • HansGolden
            April 2, 2014 at 7:04 pm

            I already answered your initial question and debunked your insinuation.

            The question was: “Why is an American military plane flying a mission within a few miles from mainland China?”
            The answer: “To spy.” We spy on them any way we can, they spy on us any way they can.

            Your insinuation: “Imagine if a Chinese military jet was flying up and down the coast of California, Fox News would call for war.”
            My response: Russia subs have done the same off our coast and there was no cry for war. We’re far friendlier with the Chinese than the Russians. So your insinuation is wrong. There is a pragmatic understanding that everyone tries to spy on everyone as much as possible and as long as they don’t break international norms, no one is going to get all that upset.

          • blckgas
            April 2, 2014 at 9:28 pm

            your posts are worthless…just be quiet or email the person you want to pick a fight with. Your fruitless posts are off-topic and have nothing to do with travel news/deals.

  2. Peter
    April 15, 2014 at 10:37 am

    If you were traveling on a business class OZ flight, why did Asiana give you access to their first class lounge in Incheon? Aren’t they supposed to put you in the business class lounge?

    • April 15, 2014 at 6:51 pm

      I convinced them that I was on a first class ticket.

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